Friday Wrap #107: Farewell to blog ranking system, teens return to Facebook, there’s more to Yo

Firday Wrap image courtesy of SNappa2006
Flickr image courtesy of SNappa2006
The Friday Wrap is a curated rundown of news, reports and posts from the past week that, while they didn’t go viral or attract much attention, are still interesting and useful for communications professionals. I select Wrap items from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow.

News

Technorati kills its blog ranking system—Technorati was once the go-to resource for searching the blogosphere—including posts with specific tags—as well as identifying the most influential bloggers. Over the last several years there has been fewer and fewer references to Technorati, and last month, with virtually no… Read More »

Friday Wrap #104: United still breaking guitars, Google loses mobile search share, and more

Friday Wrap #104
Dalek cupcake wrappers
Greetings from Toronto, site of the 2014 IABC World Conference. The city has dished up some great weather, which I plan to enjoy as soon as I finish up this week’s Wrap, a review of news and posts from the last week that might have flown by under your radar but are still of interest and use to communicators. During the week, I curate everything I find interesting on my link blog, Links From Shel, which you’re welcome to follow.

News

United still breaks guitars—For social media to work, companies need to do more than just use the tools as a communication channel. They need to listen and act based on what they… Read More »

Friday Wrap #102: Cameras at work, Facebook rules marketing, native ads okay with the public

Friday WrapThe Friday Wrap is a curated rundown of news, reports and posts from the past week that, while they didn’t go viral or attract much attention, are still interesting and useful for communications professionals. I select Wrap items from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow.

News

NLRB ruling could end another common workplace policy—A U.S. National Labor Relations Board administrative law judge found Boeing violated labor law by videotaping union protests at its facilities two years ago while also prohibiting employees from using their own cameras at work unless they had a special permit. The two activities taken together… Read More »

Friday Wrap #96: BBC pushes news via WhatsApp, the end of the strikethrough, Millennials trust UGC

Friday Wrap #96The Friday Wrap is your weekly source of curated news, research, reports and posts that may have slipped by unnoticed, but that could prove useful to communicators and marketers. I collect items that I consider including in the Wrap (as well as my podcast) at my link blog, Links From Shel, which you’re welcome to follow.

News

BBC dishes Indian election news via OTT apps—If you’re still wondering why Facebook dug deep to buy WhatsApp, consider this: The BBC is sending news about the elections in India to readers via both WhatsApp and WeChat. The “BBC News India” account on both over-the-top messaging services were crafted to share… Read More »

Is creating a video for just one customer a sound content strategy?

The notion of “content shock” is that consumers have a finite number of minutes they can dedicate to consuming content, and as the odds of your content being found and read or viewed diminish, the cost of producing that content becomes untenable.

I don’t buy the idea of content shock for a lot of reasons, many of which I articulated here. One of the points I make in this post is that few content marketers are trying to get everybody to read their posts. We target niches, where people who have an interest in our content will be more likely to find it.

In arguing that content shock is inevitable, one commenter to a Content Marketing… Read More »

Is there room for clickbait in your content marketing strategy?

UpworthyContent marketing in all its guises is designed to attract and engage a target audience. Ultimately, you want those audiences to do business with you, but you have to find and engage them first.

Those guises included everything from thoughtful articles injected into editorial streams via native advertising schemes to clever tweets deployed during a real-time event. I’m still on the fence about DiGiorno Pizza’s stream of tweets during NBC’s live telecast of The Sound of Music. PRNewswer’s Shawn Paul Wood thought they were awesome, they actually were clever, and they were consistent with the nature of tweets sent normally by the… Read More »

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