Friday Wrap #59: NTSB goes social, Fortune 500 gets more social, Reddit sparks a PR crisis, and more

Friday Wrap #59

(c) Can Stock Photo
As I was preparing this week’s Wrap, I had to force myself to stop. The week’s collection of stories that may have escaped your attention featured a lot of releases of reports and studies, several PR kerfuffles, a load of stories about great use of social and digital media, and several salient analyses. You can see all the stories I tagged this week at my link blog, LinksFromShel.tumblr.com. In the meantime, here are the ones I found most interesting or useful.

NTSB turns to social media to feed insatiable public appetite for Asiana updates

The crash landing of the Asiana Boeing 777 at San Francisco International… Read More »

Best Buy isn’t buff enough for this kind of transparency

In his book, “The Naked Corporation,” co-author Dan Tapscott argues that organizations that seek to be transparent need to ensure that the access to company information won’t reveal anything unsightly. Or, as he puts it, if you’re gonna be naked, you’d better be buff. (I heard him reiterate this point during his talk at WebCom in Toronto a couple weeks ago.)

Tapscott’s admonition was top-of-mind as I followed links from an article about a Best Buy presentation on transparency to an employee Facebook page that was less than buff.

The article—from SmartBlog on Workforce—reported on a presentation by Gil Dennis, Best Buy’s senior… Read More »

Infiltration is not a monitoring technique

Shel HoltzNot only is monitoring online conversation appropriate when your organization is in the midst of a controversy. It’s irresponsible not to. How else can an organization learn the issues that are important to the public in order to address them?

There are, however, right ways and wrong ways to go about the monitoring. Violating the principles of transparency fits into the “wrong way” category.

Bay Area power utility PG&E has been enbroiled in controversy since its flawed roll-out of smart meters, technologically-advanced meters that transmit data to the company, ending the need to send meter readers walking through neighborhoods to… Read More »

Trust and transparency take center stage as new law rewards employees for whistleblowing

imageFor some time now, I’ve been advancing the idea that hiring a warm body to fill a vacancy is no longer a viable staffing strategy. Organizations need to hire people they feel they can trust, since trust is the foundation of employee engagement. When arguing against blocking employee access to social media, I point out that it sends the same message to everyone in the organization: “We don’t trust any of you as far as we can throw you.” Why would any employee want to give discretionary effort to a company that has such little respect for its staff?

Still, I’m told repeatedly that hiring trustworthy employees is simply unrealistic.

Read More »

IABC 2010 presentation: The gold in your employees’ social graphs

My presentation this morning at the IABC 2010 World Conference expanded on my Stop Blocking theme, articulating the rationale for providing open access to social networks for employees but going a step beyond, identifying the value that can be extracted—ethically, authentically and transparently—from those networks by organizations smart enough to establish supporting models and processes.

What follows is the speaker support, developed in Prezi instead of PowerPoint You can view it full-sized here. Please keep in mind that this is speaker support and is not intended to stand on its own, although I think most of the concepts should be… Read More »

Transparency on the fly

Companies can achieve a lot of transparency through proactive effort. No matter how transparent you think you’re being, though, your customers and other stakeholders can always help you find opportunities to do better.

The mark of a transparent company isn’t getting it right immediately. It’s the degree to which the company is ready to make changes to its operations in the interest of transparency. From the perspective of an outsider, Yelp seems to have gotten that right.

imageNews of changes to Yelp, the popular customer review website, came Monday via the company’s official blog in a message from CEO Jeremy Stoppelman.

At first blush,… Read More »

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