Deathwatch: Social media innovation is not dying

Social Media Innovation: Not Dead Yet
With apologies to Monty Python
In the late 90s, some organization declared the World Wide Web was over. The prediction of the web’s demise was based on the decline in the number of corporate press releases announcing the launch of a new corporate website. (I have tried to find that report. I’ve come up empty, but my memory of the report is so clear that I’m willing to bet real money that the prediction happened.)

Of course, the web was not in decline. It had just become so common for companies to have websites that announcing it not only didn’t get you any coverage, it made you look behind the times. (“Oh, you’re finally getting around… Read More »

Friday Wrap #111: A social web standard, press releases have legs, the rise of “sadvertising”

Friday Wrap #111
Flickr photo courtesy of Loz Pycock
The Friday Wrap (which is what you’re reading) is a curated rundown of news, reports and posts from the past week that, while they didn’t go viral or attract much attention, are still interesting and useful for communications professionals. I select Wrap items from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow.

News

W3C to develop social media standards—The World Wide Web Consortium has announced it will develop a standard way to build social network operations into the Web, including adding friends, commenting, and sharing updates with text, photos, and video. The standard also will allow multiple… Read More »

The Facebook platform does not dictate the nature of political debate on Facebook

Political debate on Facebook can be illuminating if it is built on a foundation of respect.

Once they have exhausted the privacy issue, Facebook haters often turn to the fatuous updates posted by users. “Do you really want to see pictures of someone else’s food?” they lament. Well, yes, if it’s a shot by Charles Pizzo, a trained chef and connoisseur of fine dining. Charles’s pictures of food, and associated commentary, fascinate me.

“Well then,” they cry. “What about the political debate? It’s just a bunch of shouting and name-calling and people hating each other.”

Not in my experience. In my experience, political discussions on Facebook are generally courteous, thoughtful, well-reasoned, and supported by evidence. What’s… Read More »

Isn’t it time for communication to become a core company value?

I just crawled out of the corporate values statement rabbit hole.

For a couple hours, I have been reading the values statements of dozens of organizations. I kept at this thankless task in search of one—one—that explicitly listed communication as a value.

A good values statement articulates a company’s approach to its very existence. A vision statement sets a target; the vision is what the organization aspires to. A mission statement explains what the organization actually does. The values statement—the most tactical of the three—outlines how we do it. These are the company’s guiding principles, the approach we take to achieving the… Read More »

Friday Wrap #110: Blogger fined for success, automated PR, social-reputation link, mobile newsrooms

Friday Wrap #110
Bacon-wrapped hot dog Flickr image courtesy of Arnold Gatilao
The Friday Wrap (which is what you’re reading) is a curated rundown of news, reports and posts from the past week that, while they didn’t go viral or attract much attention, are still interesting and useful for communications professionals. I select Wrap items from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow.

News

French blogger fined over her review’s popularity—French blogger Caroline Doudet wrote a scathing review of the restaurant Il Giardino that met Google’s criteria so well it became the number four link in a search for the restaurant. The owner sued, claiming… Read More »

Friday Wrap #109: Yo gets serious, internal social media suffers, 3-screen advertising, and more

Friday Wrap #109
Flickr photo courtesy of Matt Reinbold
The Friday Wrap (which is what you’re reading) is a curated rundown of news, reports and posts from the past week that, while they didn’t go viral or attract much attention, are still interesting and useful for communications professionals. I select Wrap items from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow.

News

FTC may scrutinize Facebook experiment—The Facebook’s A/B test to determine if suppressing positive or negative posts leads users to post more positive or negative updates of their own may be reviewed by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, based on a request by Senator Mark Warner… Read More »

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