Friday Wrap #111: A social web standard, press releases have legs, the rise of “sadvertising”

Friday Wrap #111
Flickr photo courtesy of Loz Pycock
The Friday Wrap (which is what you’re reading) is a curated rundown of news, reports and posts from the past week that, while they didn’t go viral or attract much attention, are still interesting and useful for communications professionals. I select Wrap items from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow.

News

W3C to develop social media standards—The World Wide Web Consortium has announced it will develop a standard way to build social network operations into the Web, including adding friends, commenting, and sharing updates with text, photos, and video. The standard also will allow multiple… Read More »

Friday Wrap #110: Blogger fined for success, automated PR, social-reputation link, mobile newsrooms

Friday Wrap #110
Bacon-wrapped hot dog Flickr image courtesy of Arnold Gatilao
The Friday Wrap (which is what you’re reading) is a curated rundown of news, reports and posts from the past week that, while they didn’t go viral or attract much attention, are still interesting and useful for communications professionals. I select Wrap items from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow.

News

French blogger fined over her review’s popularity—French blogger Caroline Doudet wrote a scathing review of the restaurant Il Giardino that met Google’s criteria so well it became the number four link in a search for the restaurant. The owner sued, claiming… Read More »

Friday Wrap #109: Yo gets serious, internal social media suffers, 3-screen advertising, and more

Friday Wrap #109
Flickr photo courtesy of Matt Reinbold
The Friday Wrap (which is what you’re reading) is a curated rundown of news, reports and posts from the past week that, while they didn’t go viral or attract much attention, are still interesting and useful for communications professionals. I select Wrap items from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow.

News

FTC may scrutinize Facebook experiment—The Facebook’s A/B test to determine if suppressing positive or negative posts leads users to post more positive or negative updates of their own may be reviewed by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, based on a request by Senator Mark Warner… Read More »

The window is closing on the opportunity to get native advertising right

Let's get native advertising right

Last June at the IABC World Conference in New York, Richard Edelman told attendees at his opening keynote that the PR industry had only about a year to get control of native advertising before it fell irrevocably into the hands of advertisers who would undoubtedly screw it up.

That window is closing and the impact of advertising dominance in the native ad space is already being felt. Earlier this week, Outbrain banned native advertising from the inventory of content it promotes on websites.

Many of the lists of recommended related content at the end of posts on publisher sites are provided by Outbrain and its competitors. They’re… Read More »

Friday Wrap #106: New rules for paid Wikipedia editors and pharmas, Twitter GIFs, social sentiment

A gift-wrapped Second Life store
Second Life image courtesy of Torley
The Friday Wrap is a curated rundown of news, reports and posts from the past week that, while they didn’t go viral or attract much attention, are still interesting and useful for communications professionals. I select Wrap items from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow.

News

Wikipedia tightens rules against undisclosed editing—In the wake of the multi-agency statement committing PR agencies to playing by Wikipedia’s rules, the online collaborative encyclopedia has changed its terms of use to require disclosure from anyone paid to edit articles. Wikimedia’s top communicator explained,… Read More »

Add Wikipedia editing as a communication competency or go home

Wikipedia
Image: Giulia Forsythe
It is time to add Wikipedia to your list of communication competencies.

Yes, you should know how to create and edit an article. Wikipedia is a collaborative encyclopedia that touts its crowdsourced nature. If you represent a company or client that pays you, though, writing and editing are, for the most part, out of bounds. Your Wikipedia competency has to include an understanding of the often labyrnthine processes for having an article changed.

The issue of marketing and PR workers editing articles on behalf of clients has been around nearly as long as Wikipedia has. The mounting revelations of misbheavior did… Read More »

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