FIR Podcast #113: Not a 280-character episode

For Immediate Release

Cross-posted from the FIR Podcast Network.

Neville Hobson joined host Shel Holtz for the monthly installment of the Hobson & Holtz Report. Neville and Shel had a chinwag (as Neville would say) about these topics:

  • A follow-up to our KFC story (about 11 herbs and spices); the social media team struck again.
  • Twitter has made its new expanded 280 character count available to almost everyone. Not everyone is happy about it.
  • Uber’s new CEO took an investigator’s advice and scrapped the company’s old values statements. Instead of simply crafting a new one, he crowdsourced it to his employees, who responded in a big way.
  • The… Read More »

Friday Wrap #239: Big Brother Really Is Watching

Friday Wrap #239I extract items for the Wrap from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow. To make sure you never miss an issue, subscribe to my weekly email briefing.

News

Twitter doubles character count—Twitter has officially expanded the character count for a tweet to 280 characters. Most of those testing the new limit in late September didn’t generally take advantage of the longer count, leading some to believe that most tweets will remain short; only 1% of tweets created by the test group reached the 280-character limit, while 9% of the control group—still using the 140-character limit—reached the cap. Still, as you’ll see below, some… Read More »

Friday Wrap #238: Hamburger emojis, GIF diversity, affluent influencers, AR murder tours, and more

Friday Wrap #238I extract items for the Wrap from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow. To make sure you never miss an issue, subscribe to my weekly email briefing.

News

Microsoft integrates LinkedIn with Outlook—Outlook users can view insights, profile pictures, work history, and other information from LinkedIn profiles without leaving their inbox. Takeaway: If the LinkedIn acquisition didn’t make sense before, it should now. Expect that this is just the opening salvo; more integrations that make both services more valuable are sure to be coming. Read more

Top of mind for Google’s CEO: the hamburger emoji—Google CEO Sundar Pichai noticed… Read More »

Friday Wrap #237: Split feeds, bloated numbers, success with memes, what influencers want, and more

Friday Wrap #237I extract items for the Wrap from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow. To make sure you never miss an issue, subscribe to my weekly email briefing.

Announcement

After 21 years as an independent consultant (which followed 19 years in the corporate world), I have re-entered the corporate world. As of Tuesday, I am director of Internal Communications at Webcor, one of the largest commercial construction companies in California. I am excited about what lies ahead for me in this role. As for this newsletter, I plan to keep it going. It may be shorter, given that my time has become much less flexible, but cranking out HC+T Briefing… Read More »

Friday Wrap #236: Ethics call to action, new Twitter rules, CEOs going social, voice vs. paid search

Friday Wrap #236I extract items for the Wrap from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow. To make sure you never miss an issue, subscribe to my weekly email briefing.

News

Richard Edelman calls for industrywide ethics principles—In the wake of the Bell Pottinger scandal in the UK, Edelman CEO Richard Edelman “called for the PR industry to adopt a new set of ethics principles superseding those of trade associations.” Edelman called out the Arthur W. Page Society, PRSA, and IABC, whose codes of ethics “do not safeguard ethical behavior” and “can’t prevent what happens in the soft underbelly” of PR. The four principles to which the entire industry… Read More »

Friday Wrap #235: Adieu, AIM; Dove and Zuck are both sorry; swipe to vote your proxy, and more

Friday Wrap #235I extract items for the Wrap from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow. To make sure you never miss an issue, subscribe to my weekly email briefing.

News

AOL is shutting down Instant Messenger—Two decades ago, it revolutionized online communication: You could actually chat with someone else without using email. Twenty years later, AOL is permanently closing AOL Instant Messenger (AIM). The takeaway: The mourning of AIM’s passing is mostly nostalgic, but you have to wonder why AOL didn’t evolve the tool as it became clear that messaging would come to dominate mobile communication. It could have been Messenger or Snapchat if… Read More »

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