Friday Wrap #111: A social web standard, press releases have legs, the rise of “sadvertising”

Friday Wrap #111
Flickr photo courtesy of Loz Pycock
The Friday Wrap (which is what you’re reading) is a curated rundown of news, reports and posts from the past week that, while they didn’t go viral or attract much attention, are still interesting and useful for communications professionals. I select Wrap items from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow.

News

W3C to develop social media standards—The World Wide Web Consortium has announced it will develop a standard way to build social network operations into the Web, including adding friends, commenting, and sharing updates with text, photos, and video. The standard also will allow multiple… Read More »

The Facebook platform does not dictate the nature of political debate on Facebook

Political debate on Facebook can be illuminating if it is built on a foundation of respect.

Once they have exhausted the privacy issue, Facebook haters often turn to the fatuous updates posted by users. “Do you really want to see pictures of someone else’s food?” they lament. Well, yes, if it’s a shot by Charles Pizzo, a trained chef and connoisseur of fine dining. Charles’s pictures of food, and associated commentary, fascinate me.

“Well then,” they cry. “What about the political debate? It’s just a bunch of shouting and name-calling and people hating each other.”

Not in my experience. In my experience, political discussions on Facebook are generally courteous, thoughtful, well-reasoned, and supported by evidence. What’s… Read More »

Please stop telling me to quit Facebook

99 Days of FreedomA Dutch nonprofit, Just B.V., is behind the latest effort to get people to stop using Facebook. The campaign, “99 Days of Freedom,” was inspired by the recent Facebook A/B test that suppressed some posts to see if a more upbeat or downbeat News Feed prompted users to post more positive or negative updates of their own.

The campaign wants you to commit to dumping Facebook for 99 days, long enough to determine whether your emotions undergo any kind of metamorphosis from not using the social network. The campaign website is host to an image you can use to replace your profile picture; there’s also a personalized countdown you can share… Read More »

Friday Wrap #109: Yo gets serious, internal social media suffers, 3-screen advertising, and more

Friday Wrap #109
Flickr photo courtesy of Matt Reinbold
The Friday Wrap (which is what you’re reading) is a curated rundown of news, reports and posts from the past week that, while they didn’t go viral or attract much attention, are still interesting and useful for communications professionals. I select Wrap items from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow.

News

FTC may scrutinize Facebook experiment—The Facebook’s A/B test to determine if suppressing positive or negative posts leads users to post more positive or negative updates of their own may be reviewed by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, based on a request by Senator Mark Warner… Read More »

Friday Wrap #108: Google forgets, a new Vine metric, broker tweets, RIP Orkut, writing bots, & more

Fourth of July Friday Wrap
Flickr image courtesy of Epic Fireworks
To all my fellow Americans, a very happy Fourth of July. To all my friends and colleagues from around the world, happy Friday! The Friday Wrap (which is what you’re reading) is a curated rundown of news, reports and posts from the past week that, while they didn’t go viral or attract much attention, are still interesting and useful for communications professionals. I select Wrap items from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow.


News

Consequences of “right to be forgotten” start to emerge—The European Court ruled on May 13 that Google must honor requests from Europeans who want links to… Read More »

Facebook ran an A/B test. Get out the torches and pitchforks!

The Pitchfork and Torches Crowd Comes After Facebook Again

One of the things the Internet is best at is righteous indignation. The crowd can take up its pitchforks and torches in a heartbeat. Virtual lynchings are becoming the norm and, just as when lynchings happened IRL, they often target innocent victims. The media, quick to jump on a meme gaining velocity, spreads the stories with equal disregard for critical thinking or fact checking.

Consider fast-food chain KFC, vilified and pilloried when the crowd became outraged—outraged, I tell you—that an employee in a Mississippi restaurant asked the grandmother of a young girl disfigured in a pit bull attack to leave because her appearance was… Read More »

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