FIR Interview: Melissa Agnes and Gerard Braud debate “going dark” with social media in a crisis

 

Social media has become a standard component of crisis communication efforts. In an August 6 blog post, crisis communications and media training consultant Gerard Braud of Braud Communications argued that there could be crisis situations in which institutions would be best served by taking down their Facebook page or other social media outposts. Looking at the flood of negative, critical, and even outrageous comments left to Emory Healthcare’s Facebook page after the hospital began treating an Ebola victim, Braud concluded, “Sometimes in a crisis, you may find that it is in your best interest to rely on conventional crisis… Read More »

Mary Barra’s response to Valukas probe: First steps toward GM’s rehabilitation?

GM HeadquartersGM CEO Mary Barra has shown a number of faces during the auto giant’s recall crisis. It has been Barra’s job to serve as chief spokesperson about the recalls of some 11 million cars, recalls that took as long as 11 years to enact, a delay that caused 13 deaths the organization has acknowledged (and possibly hundreds of others they haven’t).

Barra—who only to the helm this year—has faced new revelations on a regular basis, including disclosure of an internal presentation cautioning employees to avoid using incendiary words in emails that might surface during legal discovery. (This Legal department move was particularly ill-advised. It… Read More »

Friday Wrap #103: Hashtags gone bad, Yahoo’s YouTube rival, no more Zappos job listings, and more

Friday Wrap #103The Friday Wrap is a curated rundown of news, reports and posts from the past week that, while they didn’t go viral or attract much attention, are still interesting and useful for communications professionals. I select Wrap items from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow.

Hashtag Hell

Tale #1: Chevron—Hashtag hijacking is nothing new, though it’s still remarkable that there are still big brands with volatile critics that introduce ill-advised hashtag campaigns. What happened with Chevron takes the concept in a whole new direction. #AskChevron “was not started by Chevron at all. This was a promoted tweet setup and paid for by… Read More »

Friday Wrap #102: Cameras at work, Facebook rules marketing, native ads okay with the public

Friday WrapThe Friday Wrap is a curated rundown of news, reports and posts from the past week that, while they didn’t go viral or attract much attention, are still interesting and useful for communications professionals. I select Wrap items from my link blog, which you’re welcome to follow.

News

NLRB ruling could end another common workplace policy—A U.S. National Labor Relations Board administrative law judge found Boeing violated labor law by videotaping union protests at its facilities two years ago while also prohibiting employees from using their own cameras at work unless they had a special permit. The two activities taken together… Read More »

GM’s bad words: This is what happens when leaders listen ONLY to their lawyers

Part of GM's presentation on banned wordsOn his new HBO show on Sunday, comedian John Oliver excoriated GM over its current recall crisis. CEO Mary Barra’s optimism that GM’s difficulties will result in a better, stronger company, Oliver said, must mean that the 13 people the company acknowledges were killed as a direct result of vehicle defects are actually a good thing.

Among the issues Oliver raised was a list of words employees were told to avoid using. The list, which were part of a 2008 presentation to employees on how to communicate with each other about safety issues, included deathtrap, widowmaker, and rolling sarcophagus. In all, there were 68 words and phrases… Read More »

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